Ukraine 2004

Ukraine People

Yearbook 2004

Ukraine. According to CountryAAH, the total population in Ukraine is 43,733,773 people in 2020. Ukraine experienced a dramatic political development during the year, when the democratic opposition, after many years of struggle, managed to push the old regime on the defensive. The first success came in April, when Parliament voted by a small majority to reject a constitutional change that would have allowed President Leonid Kuchma to retain power. That was the second and decisive vote on the issue. The decision meant that the proposal fell, triggering joy scenes among opposition supporters outside the parliament building in Kiev.

But that was just a taste of what was to come in the fall. When Kuchma was unable to run for a third term, the presidential election came between Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych and the opposition leader, former Prime Minister Viktor Yushchenko. The match between the two was referred to as a choice between East and West. Yanukovych was the man of the regime and was supported by Kuchma, by the people of eastern Ukraine, where there are many Russian-speaking residents, as well as by Russian President Vladimir Putin. The Kremlin contributed both money and advisors to Yanukovych, who in turn advocated continued close cooperation with Moscow for Ukraine. Yushchenko, for his part, had supporters among younger and western-oriented residents of Kiev and western Ukraine, and he attacked the country’s corruption and advocated a closer relationship with the EU.

The first round of presidential elections was held in October and opposition candidate Yushchenko won very little before Yanukovych. In the second round in November between the two polling polls showed a clear victory for Yushchenko, but according to the official voting result, Yanukovych won by 49.5% against Yushchenko’s 46.6%. The official winner was immediately congratulated by President Putin in Russia. But at home, the election results were called into question by the opposition, who claimed that there was electoral fraud. The opposition was supported by the OSCE, which pointed to a number of cases of electoral fraud, and the EU also rejected the election.

Yushchenko’s supporters gathered in Kiev for large protest demonstrations, claiming that their candidate had been ordered to victory. Barricades were built and police forces were posted. The opposition eventually gathered a couple of hundred thousand protesters at Independence Square, but got competition from Yanukovych’s supporters who demonstrated above all in the Donetsk area of ‚Äč‚Äčeastern Ukraine. Tensions rose, and incumbent President Kuchma appealed to both sides to avoid violence, but the opposition leader caused many of his supporters to go on strike strikes. Parliament gathered for a crisis meeting, declared that the election did not express the will of the people and later voted off the Yanukovych government. Kuchma had called in international mediators and the two rival presidential candidates met together with, among others. Kuchma, President of Poland, President of Lithuania and EU: s foreign policy spokesman. However, the conflict was eventually settled by the Supreme Court, which dealt with the opposition’s complaint about how the election was conducted. The court ruled that systematic cheating occurred and declared that the second round would be redone. In Parliament, a compromise was devised in which electoral laws were amended to make electoral fraud more difficult, while at the same time cutting the power of the future president in favor of Parliament. Yanukovych was convicted in a statement of mistrust in Parliament but continued in office after Kuchma refused to sign the government’s resignation. In Parliament, a compromise was devised in which electoral laws were amended to make electoral fraud more difficult, while at the same time cutting the power of the future president in favor of Parliament. Yanukovych was convicted in a mistrust of parliament but continued in office after Kuchma refused to sign the government’s resignation. In Parliament, a compromise was devised in which electoral laws were amended to make electoral fraud more difficult, while at the same time cutting the power of the future president in favor of Parliament. Yanukovych was convicted in a statement of mistrust in Parliament but continued in office after Kuchma refused to sign the government’s resignation.

Austrian doctors confirmed in December that opposition leader Yushchenko had skin changes caused by dioxin poisoning. This confirmed what Yushchenko himself claimed about his sudden illness in September. Ukrainian prosecutors declared that the previous criminal investigation into Yushchenko’s mysterious illness would resume. The suspicions were directed at the country’s security service, as Yushchenko had dined with the security chief the night before the illness.

When the second round of elections was carried out again at the end of December, Yushchenko won by 54% against just over 42% for Yanukovych. The latter, however, claimed that electoral fraud occurred and appealed the result to the Central Election Commission, whose outcome was delayed after the New Year.

Ukraine People

September

Young cadets die in a crash

September 25

A military cargo plane crashes near Kharkiv and 26 people lose their lives. Only one person survives. 20 of those on board were flight cadets in their 20s. Lack of technical maintenance is one of several possible causes of accidents that are investigated.

August

Risk of infection closes the borders

August 26th

Ukraine’s borders will be closed to incoming foreign nationals for a month, the government announced. The reason is that the number of cases of coronary heart disease has increased again. The closure will take place on 29 August. The ban does not apply to people with a permanent residence permit, truck drivers on long-distance routes and people who work with humanitarian work. Belarusian opposition figures in exile to escape President Lukashenko’s regime are also being admitted. However, the closure means that ultra-Orthodox Jews from Israel and other countries cannot make pilgrimages to the city of Uman, which they usually visit in connection with the Jewish New Year.